OEKO-TEX

Confidence in Textiles

Oeko-Tex Standard 100

Oeko-Tex Standard 100 is tested at 15 textile testing and research institutions in Europe and Japan, and at internationally well-known research institutions in over 30 countries.

Products that pass the test in this system are allowed to carry a certification label that guarantees to the consumer that the product does not contain harmful substances at levels that can be dangerous to the human body.

Modular system

Basic elements

Test criteria

News

Test method

The Oeko-Tex Standard 100 is a globally uniform testing and certification system for textile raw materials, intermediate and end products at all stages of production.

The certification covers multiple human-ecological attributes, including harmful substances which are prohibited or regulated by law, chemicals which are known to be harmful to health, but are not officially forbidden, and parameters which are included as a precautionary measure to safeguard health.

Textile products may be certified according to Oeko-Tex Standard 100 only if all components meet the required criteria without exception.

A tested textile product is allocated to one of the four Oeko-Tex product classes based on its intended use. The more intensively a product comes into contact with the skin, the stricter the human ecological requirements it must fulfill.

Oeko-Tex Standard 100 is found on millions of products around the world in (almost) all retail segments (based on more than 65,000 certificates issued to date).

Criteria

Since its introduction in 1992, the central focus of the STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX has been the development of test criteria, limit values and test methods on a scientific basis. On the basis of its comprehensive and strict catalogue of measures, with several hundred regulated individual substances, the STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX takes account of:

  • Important legal regulations, such as banned Azo colourants, formaldehyde, pentachlorophenol, cadmium, nickel, etc.
  • Numerous harmful chemicals, even if they are not yet legally regulated.
  • Requirements of Annexes XVII and XIV of the European Chemicals Regulation REACH as well as of the ECHA SVHC Candidate List insofar as they are assessed by expert groups of the OEKO-TEX Association to be relevant for fabrics, textiles, garments or accessories. Discussions and developments that are considered to be relevant are taken into account as quickly and effectively as possible through updates to the STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX requirements.
  • Requirements from the US Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) regarding lead.
  • Numerous also environmentally relevant substance classes.

Laboratory tests and product classes

The OEKO-TEX® tests for harmful substances are fundamentally based on the respective purpose of the textiles and materials. The more intensive the skin contact of a product and the more sensitive the skin, the stricter the human-ecological requirements that need to be complied with.

Accordingly, a distinction is made between four product classes:

Product class I:
Articles for babies and toddlers up to 3 years of age (underwear, rompers, clothing, bed linen, terry products etc.)

Product class II:
Articles that are worn close to the skin (underwear, bed linen, t-shirts, socks etc.)

Product class III:
Articles used away from the skin (jackets, coats etc.)

Product class IV:
Decoration/Furnishing materials (curtains, tablecloths, upholstery covers etc.)

Certification

The precondition for the certification of products in accordance with OEKO-TEX Standard 100 is that all parts of an article meet the required criteria - in addition to the outer fabric, for example, also the sewing threads, inserts, prints etc., as well as non-textile accessories, such as buttons, zip fasteners, rivets etc.

 
Additional preconditions are the existence and application of operational quality assurance measures, as well as the legally binding signing of undertakings and conformity declarations by the applicant.